Antique Gems & Jewels Book Madame De Barrera 1860 Victorian Jewelry

Antique Gems & Jewels Book Madame De Barrera 1860 Victorian Jewelry
Antique Gems & Jewels Book Madame De Barrera 1860 Victorian Jewelry
Antique Gems & Jewels Book Madame De Barrera 1860 Victorian Jewelry
Antique Gems & Jewels Book Madame De Barrera 1860 Victorian Jewelry
Antique Gems & Jewels Book Madame De Barrera 1860 Victorian Jewelry
Antique Gems & Jewels Book Madame De Barrera 1860 Victorian Jewelry
Antique Gems & Jewels Book Madame De Barrera 1860 Victorian Jewelry
Antique Gems & Jewels Book Madame De Barrera 1860 Victorian Jewelry
Antique Gems & Jewels Book Madame De Barrera 1860 Victorian Jewelry
Antique Gems & Jewels Book Madame De Barrera 1860 Victorian Jewelry

Antique Gems & Jewels Book Madame De Barrera 1860 Victorian Jewelry
Gems and Jewels, their History, Geography, Chemistry, and ANA. From the Earliest Ages Down to the Present Time. ” by Madame de Barrera, author of “Memoirs of Rachel. Very hard to find book with an extremely exhaustive history and description of gemstones and jewels, and jewelry in general (entirety of contents listed below). The book has 382 pages. I would say it’s in pretty good condition for its age (pages clean and attached throughout). The very first page has someone’s signature and the year 1863 written. There is some wear to the exterior cover/spine. There is a sticker in the front that reads: S & T Gilbert Booksellers, 4, Copthall Buildings, back of the bank. There is another little sticker in the back of the book that reads: Bound by Westleys & Co. The book measures 8″ x 5.25″. Be sure to visit my store for more. GENERAL HISTORY OF GEMS. I, Introduction: Instinctive fondness of man for diamonds and precious stones, high honor in which they have been held in all ages and lands, frequent mention of them in Sacred Writ, figurative use made of them by poets, legends of the Talmud, the study of gems connected with the knowledge of many sciences, portable nature of this species of wealth, history of celebrated gems a source of deep interest. Precious stones among the Ancients: India the birthplace of the choicest productions of nature, ancient authorities corroborative of its wealth, ancient Indian poem, Quintus Curtius, precious stones among the ancient Egyptians, Babylonians, Jews, Medes, Persians, and Greeks, Jewels establishing a link between two worlds, gems with the Hebrews, and with the ancient nations of South America. III, Precious stones among the Romans: luxury imported from the east, heights to which extravagance was carried among the Egyptians and Romans, Cleopatra’s banquet, collections of precious stones, jewels of Mithridates, genealogies of jewels, Pliny, jewels of a Roman belle, Julius Caesar, Augustus, Nero, Heliogabalus, sumptuary edicts. CH IV, Gems among the Gauls, Goths, and Franks: during the Dark Ages, treasures found in Tools and Narbonne, the Toledan cross, Trousseau of a Frankish princess, St. Eloi, the patron of the jewelers, jewels of Charles the great, heaven-guarded jewels. V, The Twelfth, thirteenth, fourteenth, and Fifteenth Centuries, 1100 – 1500: renaissance of the jeweler’s art, Abbot Suger and Louis VI, religious jewels in the ancient treasure house of St. Denis, Louis VII, grace cup of Thomas à Becket, jewels of a royal bride in the twelfth century, extravagance of jewels during the middle ages, jewels lost at the battle of Poitiers, stone-broidered robes of Philip the Bold, Isabella of Valois, and Richard II, jewels of Louis, duke of Orleans, magnificence in the house of Burgundy, important part played by jewels in the history of the Dukes of Burgundy, diamonds. VII, the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries: Sumptuary edicts of Charles IX, and of Henry III, dress of Henry IV, dress of Mary de Medici, a costly kerchief, extravagance of the court during minority of Louis XIV, the fatal bouquet, curious letter of James I. Jewels worn in hats, an expensive suit of clothes. VIII, the Eighteenth Century, 1775 to 1785: the diamond necklace, an unlucky witticism, blood-royal in the hospital, a confidential friend of the queen, royalty in pecuniary difficulties, a friend in need, the invisible purchaser, a prince’s I. IX, the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries: the revolution , the directoire, the consulate and empire, the restoration. The Geography of Precious Stones. I, Ancient Fictions and Modern Discoveries: the mythological origin of many gems, the diamond, the amethyst, the pearl, the emerald, lapis-lazuli, amber, ignorance, or at least silence, of the ancients with regard to minds of precious stones, jealousy of ancient traders in gems, the Griffin-guarded emeralds of old, Egyptian mines of the Ptolemies brought to light in Nineteenth Century, Demon-guarded mines of the present day, emerald mies in the Tyrolese Alps. II, Geography of diamonds in the old world: diamonds, where found, travelers of Tavernier, diamond mines of India; mode of working them, juvenile merchants, singular hiding place for stolen goods, silent mode of barter, the Koh-i-noor as seen by Tavernier, diamond mines of the Island of Borneo, of Siberia, of Algiers. III, Geography of precious stones in the old and new worlds: Ruby and sapphire mines of Pegu and Ava, monopoly of rubies by the Indian princes, the Island of Ceylon and its gems, difficulty of ascertaining where the ancients procured their gems, ancient authorities: Ctesias, Theophrasus, Herodotus, trade carried on by the Phoenicians and Carthaginians in the precious and fine stones, influence of the conquests of Mexico and Peru on the commerce of gems, immense quantities of emeralds brought from the new world by the companions of Cortez and Pizarro, phenomenal emerald, the five emeralds of Cortez, trying test, demon-guarded emerald mines of Peru, revival of the emerald trade of late years. IV, Geography of diamonds in the New World: Discovery of the diamond mines of Brazil, diamond districts of Serro de Frio, diamond mines of the Province of Matto Gross, Process of extraction, former prejudice against Brazilian diamonds, fallacy of judgment of great jewelers in the past century, Brobdignagian jewel, all that glitters is not a diamond. The Chemistry of Diamonds and Precious Stones. I, Science Among the Ancients and Moderns: Opinions of ancient authors as to the origin of gems, Aristoteles, Theophrastus, Avicenna, Falopius, Cardan, De Clave, Boetius de Boot, the diamond, its hardness, lustre, refraction, phosphoric and electric properties, crystallization, mode of testing, specific gravity, rough diamonds, mode of cutting, the brilliant, the rose, the table, the lasque, different colors, meaning of weight, the carat, use made of poor diamonds in the arts, commercial value of diamonds, preference given to them over colored hyalines, superior beauty of diamonds when seen by artificial light, capital invested in diamonds not subject to depreciation, chemical nature of the diamond, its combustibility, interesting experiments, attempts to make diamonds. II, Chemistry of Precious Stones: Crystal, former belief regarding its composition, classification of gems, how to distinguish white hyalines from diamonds, composition of corindons, the ruby, the sapphire, the amethyst, the topaz, the beryl, the emerald, the chrysolite, the peridot, the cymophane, the garnet, the hyacinth, the opal. III, Chemistry of Gems: Hyaline quartz, or rock-crystal; its composition, the Turkois, agates, the onyx, sardonyx, chalcedonyx, etc, jasper, feldspath, lapis-lazuli, malachite, amber. IV, Pearls: diversity of opinion as to the origin of the pearl, most probably cause of its formation, oysters inoculated with the pearl disease, chemical composition of the pearl, antiquity of the pearl trade, ancient pearl fisheries, pearl-fisheries of the present day, Pearl divers. V, Pearls: Pearl-fisheries of South America, their value when first established, quality of pearls brought to Europe, British pearl fisheries, Bohemian pearls, large pearls, price of pearls at the present day, different colored pearls, taste of the Orientals, Goa, the great Indian mart for jewels, how to preserve pearls, corruptible nature of the pearl, predilection of the Orientals for pearls, pearls constitute a portion of regalia, passion of the Romans for pearls, when introduced in Rome, pearl portraits, cost of a pearl necklace, Cleopatra outdone, Caesar a connoisseur, an enthusiastic eulogy of the pearl, when most worn in France. The Qualities, Properties, and Virtues, of Precious Stones. I, Marvelous properties attributed to gems: Qualities, properties and virtues, natural and supernatural, physical and moral, attributed in former times to diamonds and precious stones, innate fondness of man for the marvelous, the Diablerie of past days in better taste than that of the present, spirits in tables, and angels in gems, the magic of the diamond, opinions of a Savant two centuries ago, the diamond a peace maker and a tale bearer, an antidote and a poison, the diamond as an emblem among the ancients and the moderns, the gem in the Ephod, Marvelous property of the diamond. II, Of the virtues and properties, spiritual and physical, of precious stones: Precious stones used medicinally, the five precious fragments, all gems averse to poisons, gemmed cup given by Louis XI to his brother, talisman of the Count of St. Ring sent to Queen Elizabeth, innate properties of gems strengthened by magic, ring of Louis, Duke of Orleans, properties of the ruby, death-presaging ring of a German philosopher, male and female carbuncles, properties of the sapphire, consecrated to Phoebus, tables of the law, Sapphires, male and female sapphires, properties of the emerald, the eye-glass of a Roman dandy, properties of the topaz, of the amethyst, of the opal, of the turkois, of the beryl, of the agate, of the jasper, of the heliotrope, great reputation of coral, consecrated to Jupiter and Apollo, amber, pearls. III, Glyptics: Intaglios, cameos, antiquity of the glyptic art, graven gems in the Ephod and Pectoral, graven talismans, advice of a savant, stones preferred by ancient artists, celebrated antiques, shell cameos. I, Eminent personages and their jewelry: Important part played by jewels in the lives of the great, Solomon’s magic ring, talismanic ring of Gages, token ring of Rama, ring of Polycrates, anecdote of Caesar’s ring, rings sacrificed in token of grief, jewels presaging important events, Nero’s armlet, Galba’s necklace, Galba’s crown, rings of Tiberius, crowns of Henry III, Louis XVI, and James II, jewels celebrated for size and beauty, three diamonds of Charles the Bold, his jeweled hat, his three rubies, ruby in the crown of England, ruby of Rudolphe II, of Elizabeth, ruby and topaz of Runjeet Singh, ruins mentioned by De Berquen, ruby presented by the czar to the King of England, emeralds of Fernando Cortez, the Sacro Catino, emerald in the temple of Boudha, La Peregrina. II, The finest diamonds known: The paragon diamonds, diamond of the Rajah of Mattan, the Orloff, or Grand Russian, the Grand Tuscan, the regent or Pitt, the star of the south, the Koh-i-noor, the Shah of Persia, history of three diamonds of Charles the Bold, including the Sancy, the Nassuck, the Pigott, the blue diamond, the crown jewels of Spain and Brazil. III, Different jewels worn in ancient and modern times: Nose, chin, cheek, lip, and ear jewels, pistols and poniards, jewels of a daughter of the House of Alba, daggers of Eastern Princesses, Military collars and chains of the Romans, Gauls, Mediaeval Knights, and of Modera orders, necklace of Penelope; of Eriphyle; of Agnes Sorel; of the Queen of Scots, of the Duchess of Berry; of the present Queen of Prussia, of the Empress Eugenie; the girdle an insignia of Knighthood, charmed girdle of Pedro of Castile, diamond girdle of Isabel II, crowns, floral coronals, gold crowns, crowns military rewards, different kinds of crowns, snuff boxes, shoe buckles. IV, Ear-rings: their antiquity, Juno’s ear-rings, Penelope’s ear-rings, Ear-rings of Egyptian ladies, Eve’s ears bored, fatal ear-rings of the Israelites, Arab saying, weight of Jewish ear-rings, ear-rings among the Greeks and Romans, extravagance of Roman belles, different kinds of ear-rings, ear doctresses, title of the Emperor of Astracan, the ear-ring an insignia of knighthood, ear-jewels of the Chola girls. V, Bracelets-armlets: The armlet a token of sovereignty in the East, worn by men, antiquity of the bracelet, Egyptian bracelets, not an ancient fashion with the Greeks, mentioned in Holy Writ, the bracelet among the Moderns in the Wast, the armillae of Romans, armlets of the Sabines, the bracelet not worn by girls, different kinds of bracelets worn in Rome, armlets of the Gauls and Saxons, used to render contracts binding, celebrated armlets. VI, Rings: Earliest mention of rings, mistaken idea of the ancients, the ring a symbol of omnipotence, rings among the Hindoos, in Holy Writ, Seal-ring among the Hebrews, no mention of rings in Homer, Seals, but no seal-rings, among the ancient Americans, how worn among different nations, rings among the Romans, the Iron ring, fable of Prometheus, the gold ring, by whom, worn, dissensions it occasioned, edicts with regard to it, absurd length to which the fashion was carried, rings on every joint, winter and summer rings, the Pugilists’ ring, rings of lawyers and orators, hired as aids to eloquence, the Dactyliomancia, charmed, consecrated, and hallowed rings. VII, Rings: The Sigillarius or seal-rings, rings of Alexander, Sylla , Caesar, Pompey, Augustus, and Maecenas, seal ring the prerogative of the wife or eldest daughter, the Episcopal ring, the Annulus Piscatoris, or fisherman’s ring, the Annulus Sponsalium, or Nuptial ring, the Doge’s ring, Armenian betrothals, a kiss, a ring, and a pair of shoes, the prodigal philosopher, the mourning ring, the gimmal ring, rings given at weddings, rings in the Middle Ages, vie et bagues sauves, one blue au doigt, an Arab saying, the thumb ring, poison in rings, rings of Demosthenes and Hannibal, Roman lovers, rings as souvenirs, signals, passports, safeguards, devices in rings, a Persian custom, fashion for rings under Henry III, Louis XVI, the Directoire, Love’s telegraph, Letter of Pope Innocent to King John. VIII, Pawned Jewels: Jewels a ready resource, Many an unsuspected parure acquainted with my uncle, diamonds of Mademoiselle , ten years at the Mont de Piete, Jewels a safe investment during the Middle Ages, Ancient Romans au fait in the mysteries of Pawning, Vitellius pledges his Mother’s Pearl, the sand filled coffers of the Cid. Henry III pledges the Virgin, and Edward III his best friend, the Black Prince, Henry V, Henry VI, and Richard II, jewels of the Great continually traveling back and forth, jewels of the Duke of Burgundy pawned, Poverty of the King of France, and rapacity of his Nobles, jewels of the Dukes of Orleans pledged, of Elizabeth of York, Henry VIII, Anne Boleyn, James VI, Henrietta Maria, and Mary Beatrice of Modena, Napoleon I and the Regent, Annual report of the Mont de Piete. IX, Great jewel robberies: robbery of Garde-Meubles, of the diamonds of the Princess of Santa Croce, of Malle. Of the Princess of Orange. Be sure to visit my store for more hard to find books! Add me to your favorite sellers to see new listings! The item “Antique Gems & Jewels Book Madame De Barrera 1860 Victorian Jewelry” is in sale since Friday, June 7, 2019. This item is in the category “Books\Antiquarian & Collectible”. The seller is “oh_you_pretty_things” and is located in Pasadena, California. This item can be shipped to United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Australia.
  • Year Printed: 1860
  • Modified Item: No
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United Kingdom
  • Topic: Gemstones
  • Binding: Fine Binding
  • Author: Madame de Barrera
  • Subject: Gems
  • Original/Facsimile: Original
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Richard Bentley
  • Place of Publication: London
  • Special Attributes: 1st Edition

Antique Gems & Jewels Book Madame De Barrera 1860 Victorian Jewelry