Vintage Antique Jewelry Victorian Art Deco Nouveau Lalique Cartier Dior Enamel

Vintage Antique Jewelry Victorian Art Deco Nouveau Lalique Cartier Dior Enamel
Vintage Antique Jewelry Victorian Art Deco Nouveau Lalique Cartier Dior Enamel
Vintage Antique Jewelry Victorian Art Deco Nouveau Lalique Cartier Dior Enamel
Vintage Antique Jewelry Victorian Art Deco Nouveau Lalique Cartier Dior Enamel
Vintage Antique Jewelry Victorian Art Deco Nouveau Lalique Cartier Dior Enamel
Vintage Antique Jewelry Victorian Art Deco Nouveau Lalique Cartier Dior Enamel
Vintage Antique Jewelry Victorian Art Deco Nouveau Lalique Cartier Dior Enamel
Vintage Antique Jewelry Victorian Art Deco Nouveau Lalique Cartier Dior Enamel
Vintage Antique Jewelry Victorian Art Deco Nouveau Lalique Cartier Dior Enamel
Vintage Antique Jewelry Victorian Art Deco Nouveau Lalique Cartier Dior Enamel
Vintage Antique Jewelry Victorian Art Deco Nouveau Lalique Cartier Dior Enamel

Vintage Antique Jewelry Victorian Art Deco Nouveau Lalique Cartier Dior Enamel
“Vintage Jewellery” by Caroline Cox. NOTE : We have 75,000 books in our library, almost 10,000 different titles. Odds are we have other copies of this same title in varying conditions, some less expensive, some better condition. We might also have different editions as well (some paperback, some hardcover, oftentimes international editions). We’re happy to send you a summary of the differing conditions and prices we may have for the same title. Publisher : Carlton Books (2015). Size : 11 x 8¾ x ¾ inch; 2¼ pounds. Summary : Decade by decade, the lavishly illustrated “Vintage Jewelry” recounts 120 years of history, from Lalique’s Art Nouveau enameling at the turn of the twentieth century to Cartier’s gemstones and Christian Dior’s mid-century costume pieces to Harry Winston’s diamonds. Accompanied by archive images, fashion photography and specially commissioned photographs of period pieces, the most collectible and beautiful bracelets, necklaces, rings and brooches are showcased. An invaluable reference as well as a visual delight of times past, the book explores the key designers and jewelry houses, technical developments and cultural influences that shaped historic jewelry design styles. Whether you have inherited heirloom pieces you’d like to learn more about, collect by era or gemstone, or simply enjoy picking up unique items from auctions and antique markets, this book offers information on how to identify authentic period jewelry, as well as how to spot a reproduction. A glossary on gemstone and jewelry terminology explains metals, settings, styles and cuts, while a shopping and collecting guide gives pointers on sourcing and caring for vintage pieces. Carlton Books (2015) 224 pages. Unblemished, unmarked, pristine in every respect. Pages are pristine; clean, crisp, unmarked, unmutilated, tightly bound, unambiguously unread. No disappointments, no excuses. HEAVILY PADDED, DAMAGE-FREE PACKAGING! Meticulous and accurate descriptions! PLEASE SEE DESCRIPTIONS AND IMAGES BELOW FOR DETAILED REVIEWS AND FOR PAGES OF PICTURES FROM INSIDE OF BOOK. PLEASE SEE PUBLISHER, PROFESSIONAL, AND READER REVIEWS BELOW. REVIEW : Decade by decade, the lavishly illustrated “Vintage Jewelry” recounts 120 years of history, from Lalique’s Art Nouveau enameling at the turn of the twentieth century to Cartier’s gemstones and Christian Dior’s mid-century costume pieces to Harry Winston’s diamonds. An invaluable reference as well as a visual delight of times past, the book explores the key designers and jewelry houses, technical developments and cultural influences that shaped jewelry design. Each chapter begins with a historical introduction to the era. The chapter then develops along themes – such as materials, shapes, advances in technology and information about the gemstone industry. Each decade ends with a’key looks’ spread showing an at-a-glance view of the important designs that defined the era. REVIEW : This gorgeous coffee-table book, with a foreword by influential jeweler Gerda Flöckinger, showcases classic vintage jewelry from the past 100 years. Featuring examples that epitomize the iconic styles of each decade, it offers an overview of the most influential designers (including Tiffany, Cartier, Fabergé, and Chanel), their sources of inspiration, and materials of choice. REVIEW : Decade by decade, the lavishly illustrated “Vintage Jewelry” recounts over 100 years of history, from Lalique’s Art Nouveau enameling at the turn of the twentieth century to Cartier’s gemstones and Christian Dior’s mid-century costume pieces to Harry Winston’s diamonds. An invaluable reference as well as a visual delight of times past, the book explores the key designers and jewelry houses that shaped jewelry design. REVIEW : Caroline Cox, visiting professor at the London School of Fashion, is a leading fashion authority whose work explores the relationship between fashion, beauty and culture. A lecturer and broadcaster, she is also a cultural trends advisor at Vidal Sassoon. Caroline’s books on fashion history and theory have been published internationally and include “Vintage Shoes” (Carlton, 2008), “Lingerie: A Lexicon of Style” (2000) and “Stiletto” (2004). REVIEW : Forward writer Gerda Flockinger is widely considered one of the most influential artist-jewelers of the twentieth century. Her experimental course at the Hornsey College of Art in London in 1962 marked a watershed in the regeneration of British jewelry design. Foreword by Gerda Flockinger. 1890-10: Divinely Decadent (ASrt Nouveau). 1910s: The Edwardian Period. 1920s: Streamlined and Chic (Art Deco Designs). 1930s: Hollywood Glamor (The Age of Progress). 1940s: “F” for Fake (Faux Fashions). 1960s: POP Goes the Future (The Swinging Sixties). 1970s: The Body, Bold and Beautiful (Natural and Free). 1980s: The Power and the Glory. 1990s to Now: Future Collectibles. (Vintage) Shopping & Collecting Guide. Glossary of Jewelry Terms. Further Reading and Acknowledgements. REVIEW : I was thoroughly surprised when I read this bookk. For some reason the title made me think it was more about designing jewelry – but as I paid more attention I became captivated by this gem of a book. It is, in fact, about jewelry design – but it’s about the history of jewelry design! As a history buff – this book was really up my alley! Although I don’t wear a lot of jewelry myself I sure do appreciate it. Thanks to this book I can now identify the period style that most appeals to me. Who knows – when I win the lottery I may go in search of Belle Epoch jewels! As you can tell from having a look at the contents page the book breaks down the history jewelry design into decades. What was fashionable during this time – and why was it fashionable? How the particular period of history influenced the design and appeal of fashionable jewelry. The book is visually appealing, the layout and photography is spot on. The author, Caroline Cox is a visiting professor at the London College of Fashion and the focus of her work “explores the relationship between fashion, beauty and culture”. Cox is both a lecturer and a cultural trends advisor. I can’t think of much more interesting work. The publisher’s layouts often seem to employ a grid. I think this approach works very well especially at the beginning of a chapter -it gives the reader a glimpse of what the pages in the next chapter will cover. The grid will depict the that period covered is, for example, 1910- 1919 and then there are thumb nail examples of the fashion, jewelry designs and art that was in vogue at the time. The book beautifully covers baubles, bangles, beads, gemstones of incredible value and beauty as well as examples of contemporary fashions and art. Historical notes about well know jewelry designers are included – Faberge, Tiffany, Schlumberger, and Schiaparelli just to name a few. Want to know the history of Bakelite and celluloid? This is the book to grab and read. I love the photos in the book – of famous models, celebrities, high society folks and the titillating world of high fashion. I love the way the book ties everything together. Historical references refer to why certain styles, trends and materials came in to fashion when they did. That information is rounded out with a perfect collection of corresponding fashions, make-up styles and artistic works that defined the decade. Because it was such a delightful surprise and because it fits right in with my enjoyment of all things fashion, costume, and historical. This book will have a wide appeal I think because it does cover so much. It’s perfect, of course, for jewelry designers and all of us who love gems and jewels, but it also will appeal to artists, designers, fashionistas and history buffs. I love this book and it does – for certain – have a spot in my permanent library! REVIEW : First let me say that this volume takes everything you would expect and bumps it up 10 fold. Gorgeous photos – check. Brilliant information – check. Strategically Assembled – check. “Vintage Jewelry” is the brainchild of an amazing woman, Caroline Cox who is a professor of cultural history at the University of the Arts, London, a world renown speaker on the relationship between fashion, beauty and culture and the author of “Lingerie: A Lexicon of Style” (2000) and “Hair and Fashion” (2005), which had an accompanying catwalk show at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London. The author and her background are part of what keeps this book from being just a coffee table book – looking at the impact of current events on the Jewelry of the day. I think we can all think of examples of this in our lifetime… The laid back hippie era that lead to a more straight laced preppy culture (or vice versa – depending on which end of the hippie movement you landed in). Cox talks about wildly erotic fashion and hairstyles of the Art Deco Age that followed the high necked collars of the Victorians – so I guess rebellion is nothing new! This book will find its way to your reference shelf – it talks in detail about each decade and trend. The smooth undulating lines and soft colors of the Art Nouveau Era; The fine detail and white on white (diamonds in platinum) trend of Edwardian jewels; The clean almost architectural lines and black & white of the Art Deco Era; To the fabulousness of the “fake” gems and almost gaudy costume jewels of the 40’s… The difference is that this book talks about the jewelry in context with the fashion and politics of the times. My favorite feature of this jewel filled tome is the Grid Pages. These double page spreads look at the Key looks of the decade! , with glamour shots of stars, key fashion trends and jewelry – jewelry – jewelry! One thing that is included in this book that is missing from most guides is that Cox tries to cover any prominent “Art” Jewelers of the era she is looking at – this is a nod that most artisans would love to see become the norm in Jewelry Design books. REVIEW : REVIEW : Cox (cultural history, University of the Arts, London; Stiletto) showcases 120 years of fabulous jewelry from well-known artisans, celebrity designers, and production houses, including Cartier, Chanel, Dali, Faberge, Fulco di Verdura, Alexander McQueen, Tiffany, and Van Cleef & Arpels. Historical and vintage photographs and helpful captions accentuate the succinct, well-written text. The chapters highlight major trends by decade. Examples are “Edwardian Era” (1910s), which shows the elegance of Faberge, Cartier, Boucheron, and items from the war years; “Hollywood Glamour” (1930s), showing flashy and iconic designs and one-of-a-kind pieces for celebrities; “Mid-Century Sparkle” (1950s), which displays French figurative jewelry and the marvels of Schlumberger, Tiffany, Dior, Swarovski crystals, and charm bracelets; “Pop Goes the Future” (1960s), where anything goes, from ethnic designs and hippie motifs to space-age modern; and “Future Collectibles, ” which presents new designers like Shaun Leane, Frank Gehry, and Kazumi Nagano. This affordably priced retrospective is recommended for individuals interested in modern jewelry history as well as libraries with collections in decorative arts and design. REVIEW : My friend handed me a copy of “Vintage Jewelry” with confidence. He knew I would drool all over this beauty of a book, ablaze with grainy black and white photographs of saucy women wearing miles of pearls, and in-your-face spreads of pop icons like Grace Jones strutting funky adornments. Flipping through the pages of this book by Caroline Cox, I’m reminded why I love jewelry. Why as little girl I loved my grandmother’s sparkly gemstone brooches (and why I love them more now). Why I think anyone with two x chromosomes must own a strand of pearls. Why, in my opinion, Bakelite jewelry is the coolest thing since sliced bread. Why I see many of my sculptural, one-of-a-kind pieces as works of art. I believe jewelry communicates. It speaks to an individual’s personality. It whispers of a by-gone era. It portrays culture, evolutions and transitions. It makes statements and it tells stories. “Vintage Jewelry” is a chronicle of the last 100-plus years of jewelry design. From the “divinely decadent” 1890s (Art Nouveau) to “Hollywood glamour” of the 1930s (platinum & diamonds, “white on white”), from the “F for fake” 1940s (plastics and costume jewelry) to “future collectibles” of the present day (architectural and sculptural designs, and conversation pieces). Caroline covers each decade, discussing cultural, socio-political and artistic influences on jewelry design. She talks about the birth of fashion houses such as Tiffany, Chanel and Cartier and the birth of jewelry trends through experimentation and ingenuity. The 224-page book includes a shopping and collecting guide, tips on spotting a fake (diamond and costume) and how to care for vintage jewelry. Who needs this book? According to Caroline, Quite simply, anyone who loves jewelry! Oh, and did I mention? The photography is to die for! It’s not hard to see Caroline’s love of jewelry fashion and culture. I wanted to hear about the process of putting together such a chronicle, especially from someone who eats and breathes fashion, and is recognized internationally as an authority on fashion history. Q: “Tell me a bit about the inception of’Vintage Jewelry'”. A: I’ve always been interested in the relationship between the history of fashion and the body; jewelry is one of the earliest forms of body adornment so I have wanted to write about it for ages. It seems that the desire to decorate the body with fabulous jewels has always been a natural human preoccupation and the beauty of precious gemstones has been lauded since the beginning of civilization. It’s one of our oldest forms of currency and also a potent expression of the zeitgeist showing the changing role of women in society. ” A: “Talk about the decades you cover in the book, and did you have a favorite? ” A: “I cover the Art Nouveau period through to the present day in the book, so 1890 on. The first chapter deals with the nature-inspired motifs of Art Nouveau; the second with the filigree settings and platinum and diamond pieces that are known as the’white on white’ style during the Edwardian era. The Art Deco geometry inspired by Cubism is covered in the third and from then on the book covers’30s Hollywood and firms such as Tiffany and Cartier, the showy designs of the 1940s with its faux gemstones and flashy metal settings and the coordinated couture looks of the fifties. A liveliness of design characterized the 1960s with experimentation with PVC and plastics; bohemianism and global influences marked out the seventies and a brash luxury in the 1980s. I conclude with a chapter on future collectibles. My favourite decade is the under-rated’70s with the huge influence of conceptual art on jewelry and the brutalist pieces of the Canadian jewelrs such as Robert Larin. Q: What intrigues you about jewelry design? ” A: “From a personal point of view, I have been collecting all things vintage from a very early age because, for me, antique fashion including shoes, bags (both of which I’ve also written about) and jewelry are all fascinating. Essentially, jewelry for me is a form of portable sculpture that one can wear on the body. It is a three-dimensional shape that can achieve any form as long as it can be attached to the person in some way. It is a freer form that fashion because it is released from many of the demands of function. Q: What IS it about jewelry? Does jewelry say something about its wearer? ” A: “Adorning the body is a natural human preoccupation and always says something about the wearer whether it’s social status, wealth or simple taste levels. Like any form of fashion it reflects the zeitgeist; Marilyn Monroe singing’Diamonds are a Girl’s Best Friend’ fused our cultural obsession with gems on film in 1953 and the ups and downs of the love affair between Liz Taylor and Richard Burton was celebrated with ice. Industrially sized bling showed status in hip-hop – and on it goes. ” Q: “What challenges do you think present-day jewelry designers face? I think people will want jewelry that has more personal meaning in our troubled times which will be a boon for independent craftspeople rather than big brands or deluxe houses. ” Q: “Based in your expertise in fashion history, what do you think we’ll be seeing in jewelry design 10 years from now? What’s the next step for the jewelry designer? ” A: “I think we will move from bling to more global influences – beadwork, stone and matte surfaces rather than shiny, flashy stuff. I think minimalism will take over from today’s maximalism in jewelry in the same way it is in fashion. ” Q: “Finally, what vintage pieces do you own that you would never part with? ” A: “I can let you into a secret-all the jewelry on page 169 of the book belongs to me! And no, I would never part with it! Caroline Cox is an international authority on fashion history. Her books include Stiletto, Vintage Shoes, How to be Adored and Grown-Up Glamour. Originally an art historian, she moved into fashion theory and history in the 1980s, soon becoming Head of Cultural Studies at the London College of Fashion. She was later headhunted to become the International Trends Consultant at Vidal Sassoon’s Advanced Academy in London. Caroline broadcasts regularly on fashion and beauty culture for the BBC and as a cultural commentator on fashion trends she appears regularly on radio and TV. For her outstanding contribution to Cultural History, Caroline was awarded an Honorary Professorship at the University of Arts, London. I’m pretty hopeful that Santa is reading this and drops “Vintage Jewelry” under the tree for me. This luscious book reminds me why I love jewelry, and it’s a great idea generator for anyone who designs jewelry and is a part of this ever-growing, always evolving industry. As for a vintage piece I would never part with? It’s gotta be the strappy faux pearl bracelet I picked up many years ago from a consignment store. The finish has chipped off some of the pearls and the base metal, but I care not! I feel like I’m right back in the 1930s when I wear it! REVIEW : Accompanied by archive images, fashion photography and beautiful bracelets, necklaces, rings and brooches, this book explores the key designers and jewelry houses, technical developments and cultural influences that shaped jewelry design. A “must-have” resource for those with an interest in vintage jewelry. REVIEW : Presents over 100 years of history of jewelry, from Lalique’s Art Nouveau enameling at the turn of the twentieth century to Cartier’s gemstones and Christian Dior’s mid-century costume pieces to Harry Winston’s diamonds. This book showcases some of the most collectible and beautiful bracelets, necklaces, rings and brooches. Excellent throughout, and highly recommended. REVIEW : You must get this gorgeous book. Believe me, you will fall in love with it. ” Loaded with mouth-watering images of splendid jewelry, famous women who wore it and the designers who made it, “Vintage Jewelry is a fabulous cocktail table book and a must-have for the true jewelry aficionado. [Contemporary Jewelry Design Group]. REVIEW : “Vintage Jewelry”, a lavishly illustrated account of more than 100 years of prettification, from Art Nouveau at Lalique to Harry Winston’s diamonds, is perfect for trinket lovers. REVIEW : Attention all New York fashionistas and jewelry lovers alike: This is a coffee table book to beat all coffee table books! Cox leaves no gemstone unturned in her quest to fascinate, amuse and amaze us with stories and photos that will delight jewelry lovers of all ages. If you love jewelry and you’re crazy about fashion design, don’t miss this – it’s a lesson in style you will never forget! REVIEW : This lovely, well illustrated volume will delight both the vintage jewelry collector and the novice with stunning photographs and useful information. It is also of value to designers, art students and jewelry makers for a wealth of ideas from the past that can be incorporated into modern creations. This is a breathtakingly beautiful volume that serves as both a work of reference and a pleasurable entertainment. REVIEW : Caroline Cox has written a fantastic book that chronicles vintage jewelry design from the 1830s to the current trends. If you are interested in the history of design, and want some inspiration for your own designs, this is a great book to have on hand. “Vintage Jewelry” is a thoughtful and informative book that covers jewelry from the 1890s to the present time. The book brings home the point that jewelry is not only decoration and adornment, it is a reflection of who we view ourselves to be. And the pictures: Wow. REVIEW : If you have wanted to learn more about jewelry and its history, or have thought of collecting a certain period of jewelry, this is an excellent guide. The text is very detailed throughout and full of photos that show jewelry pieces from each decade discussed. It is also a good resource for getting design ideas that you can combine with your own signature jewelry pieces. [About. Com: Jewelry Making]. REVIEW : One of the oldest forms of art, prior to the late 1800’s jewelry was worn primarily by the wealthy and powerful. Gemstones were currency, treasured for their beauty and their worth, passed down by the aristocracy and ruling families to the next generation and worn for state occasions. “Vintage Jewelry”is an historical guide to vintage collectable jewelry, a valuable book for the collector and fascinating for anyone who loves jewelry. Each decade of the last hundred years is examined and its jewelry is placed within a cultural context. With the dawn of the industrial age, a huge middle class was born, and with it began the age of the consumer. More people had disposable income, and so they began to copy the styles of the rich. Brand name jewelry designers like Cartier, Fabergé, Tiffany, etc. Where previously these jewelry houses created pieces only for their patrons, by the 1890’s they had expanded their following to the new industrialists. Women around the world began to clamor for the jewelry worn by the women of the British and European royal families and by the actresses and courtesans who were showered with jewels by their royal lovers. Edith Wharton’s Buccaneers, the story of young American heiresses who went to Europe seeking a marriage with a title was playing out for real in the life of Consuelo Vanderbilt. From that auspicious beginning, Ms. Cox guides us through the evolutionary twists and turns of jewelry as art as well as industry, accompanied by gorgeous images of jewelry from each period. The difference between the jewelry of the first two decades of the Twentieth Century (through the First World War) and the 1920’s was remarkable. The rise of modernism tossed aside the intricacies of Art Nouveau and the heavy Edwardian style. In the 1920’s Coco Chanel almost single-handedly invented Costume Jewelry. Replacing real gemstones with colored glass, and using gold-toned metal and faux pearls, Chanel changed the rules about jewelry and how to wear it. She popularized the little black dress to be worn at any time, not just for mourning; black was the perfect background for jewelry. Diamond merchants could no longer count on their traditional customers because even the wealthy had trouble with funds in the 1930’s. DeBeers, and other diamond merchants, realized that the image of the diamond as a bauble for the rich had to be changed, and so began a rebranding of the diamond that is still with us today. In the last historical chapter of the book, the 1990’s to today, much of what is called’future collectables’ are pieces that were designed for Alexander McQueen, John Galliano, and other European designers to accompany their fashion shows. Some attention is paid to Robert Lee Morris, Paloma Picasso, George Jensen, Frank Gehry and the British designers Shaun Leane and Theo Fannell. “Vintage Jewelry” has a shopping and collecting guide that is vital reading for anyone who is collecting vintage jewelry, particularly the advice on how to spot a fake. There are listings for stores and websites that specialize in vintage jewelry, and there is a complete glossary of jewelry terms that would be helpful for anyone who buys jewelry. The descriptions and accompanying photographs for each decade are valuable references. The photographs feature many close ups and images that are more than full sized, giving the reader a real glimpse into the fine detail of the jewelry. This is truly a fun book to read. Loaded with mouth-watering images of splendid jewelry, famous women who wore it and the designers who made it, “Vintage Jewelry Design, Classics to Collect and Wear” is a fabulous cocktail table book and a must-have for the true jewelry afficionado. REVIEW : Are you a lover of wonderful jewelry? This amazing book will be the perfect book to have. I have always loved the mystery about the relationship with the cultural influence in jewelry and this fantastic book will take you from Art Nouveau, circa 1890 to present day. The author, Caroline Cox, is a leading fashion authority whose work explores the relationship between fashion, beauty and culture. The book covers more than 100 years of jewelry history, focusing on different designers and trends of each decade. I enjoyed so much looking at the trends in each decade and falling in love all over again with some wonderful designs. The pictures of the jewelry are incredible, rare pieces from museums and private owners will take your breath away. You must get this gorgeous book! REVIEW : When I spied “Vintage Jewelry” during a recent visit to Craft Test Dummies World Headquarters I knew I had to have it. You see, with all of the cleaning out we’ve done the past couple of years at my Mother In Laws home in the Poconos I’ve acquired a little stash of vintage jewelry and I’ve been trying to uncover more information about some of the pieces. You know, before I tear it apart. Jenny graciously allowed me to sneak away with it. While I haven’t found any of the EXACT pieces I own in the book I do have a better idea of the time period some of my pieces were created in, how they were worn and a sense of the styles of clothing worn with the pieces. Like this gold and pearl brooch above that is likely from the 1950’s which was the “era of pearls” and a pin like this was often worn to accent simple tailored suits by day. ” Here are some other Vintage Jewelry Design stats. 224 pages. Index for “Shopping and Collecting. Glossary of Jewelry Terms. Index. Broken down into time periods. Not only is this book full of historical and collecting information I think it will also be a great source of inspiration for some of the pieces I create. A reference to keep on my work table for sure. REVIEW : I love, love, love this book. INSPIRATIONAL front to back! – You should go get a copy. Caroline Cox brings us ten decades of jewelry design history, all wrapped up in a gorgeous and collectible volume. REVIEW : Caroline Cox has compiled images of the most iconic styles of each decade in her new book. Everyone loves a nostalgic coffee-table book, and long time fashion lovers will surely appreciate the gorgeous images in Vintage Jewelry. REVIEW : “Vintage Jewelry” by Caroline Cox is a delightful and informative look at the exquisite diamonds, pearls, emeralds, rubies and precious metals designed by Cartier, Christian Dior, Fabergé, Tiffany, René Lalique, Boucheron and others through the 20th century. An invaluable reference and visual treat for all admirers of beautiful jewelry. REVIEW : The amazing photographs are accompanied by Cox’s interesting, well-written, and well-thought-out prose. “Vintage Jewelry” is an informative, fascinating, and rewarding read. REVIEW : This book is a must-read for anyone who is serious about jewelry. It is the jewelry book of the year… The power of this book will make you think, change your mind, (and) inspire your soul. REVIEW : I was very excited when “Vintage Jewelry” by Caroline Cox landed on my door step. I love that people have been beading in some shape or form for thousands of years and I think that beads, jewelry designs and fashion can tell a lot about different time periods in different regions of the world. This book covers jewelry designs from 1890-current by breaking down each decade. I was mesmerized as I looked through this book. I love the full page pictures that captured not only the jewelry but also the fashion. It is very informative with wonderful photographs. Takes you clearly through the decades and gives a resume of the styles. A fabulous reference book and one that I have used many times as inspiration when designing. Also great if you want to collect vintage jewelry. REVIEW : I love vintage jewelry and this is a nice addition to my growing collection of books about this fascinating subject. Good photographs and descriptions make it interesting and informative. A good companion volume to the publisher’s other books on vintage clothes, shoes, handbags etc. REVIEW : Although this book is aimed at the collector, it is a great source book for jewelry designers. It covers each decade in the 20th century, illustrating style trends and jewelry makers with beautiful fashion photos. REVIEW : Beautiful coffee table book with outstanding photographs. Recommended for anyone who enjoys vintage fashion and/or vintage jewelry. Not only does the book provide photos of jewelry from the past 200 years, it gives a brief history of the associated time period as well. REVIEW : A brilliant book! This book takes you through the ages of design and a background to what started the latest trends. A must have book for those passionate about jewelry. REVIEW : Reviews the history of jewelry design movements through the 20th century, basically by decade (the first one stretches back to 1890). The focus is mainly high-end and brand-name designers. There’s a fair amount of good information. The main plus for me is the strong use of period photos, even though they’re mainly advertising shots. A decent coffee-table book, some nice photos, I can see it as a useful reference in a vintage clothing store, for example, to see how things went together in different periods. REVIEW : Lots of lovely pictures to inspire the beader, jewelry, or textile artist, it has so much to offer a large range of reader, it is a joy to look through. REVIEW : A perfect book for my journey collecting vintage pieces. A lovely book that I keep coming back to. Great descriptions and illustrations. REVIEW : An interesting coffee table book on jewelry design. I’ve always been interested in how historical events affect fashion and design, for example, Egyptian crazes after tomb discoveries, or atomic prints in 1950s wallpaper and fabrics. REVIEW : Informative and helpful, though it focused more on collectibles than things for everyday wear. That’s not bad at all, it’s just useful to know. Very informative book, lovely photography. Makes a great gift! REVIEW : How vintage jewelry brings old-time glamour to the red carpet. Among all the gemstones paraded on the red carpets of Cannes, Venice, Hollywood and New York, some pieces leave an indelible impression. At this year’s Manus X Machina-themed Met Gala, the award for best supporting accessory went to a majestic diamond peacock, its tail curving over one strap of Uma Thurman’s custom-made Ralph Lauren ivory gown. Created as a special order by Cartier in 1948 and comprising 83.89ct of diamonds, the brooch demonstrated the power of vintage when it comes to making a statement on the red carpet. “Vintage jewelry brings character and a sense of nostalgia to a look, ” says LA-based British stylist Tanya Gill, who dresses stars such as Kate Winslet, Julie Christie and Jane Fonda. I love the craftsmanship, the history and the patina. Gill was responsible for the eye-catching vintage Bulgari bib necklace that Minnie Driver wore to the Vanity Fair Oscars party in 2014. Made in 1965, the necklace caught Gill’s eye at Bulgari’s Decades of Glamour pre-Oscar event. “It struck me as so exquisite in design and colour, with the craftsmanship of the turquoise, cabochon emeralds, cabochon amethysts and diamonds, that it would be a unique statement for the right personality, ” she says. It was perfect for the statuesque beauty of Minnie Driver. It’s not only Hollywood’s grandes dames who carry off vintage glamour. At the Met Gala, Anna Wintour’s 29-year-old daughter, Bee Shaffer, was every inch the ingénue in 19th-century diamond chandelier earrings and a slim diamond headband by the New York-based vintage-jewelry specialist Fred Leighton, while at the reopening of Cartier’s Fifth Avenue mansion in September, Sienna Miller accessorised a fresh, floaty Valentino dress with a suite of diamond and emerald Cartier jewels from the 1920s. The trend for vintage jewelry on the red carpet was kick-started in 1996, when Prada borrowed a 19th-century opal choker from Fred Leighton for a then-29-year-old Nicole Kidman. “It was a wonderful moment for us, ” recalls Rebecca Selva, Fred Leighton’s chief creative officer and public relations director. It commanded tremendous attention because it was so different. The collaboration sparked a long-term relationship with Kidman and began two decades of “beautiful and iconic moments” for Fred Leighton. Selva cites Charlize Theron’s appearance at the Vanity Fair Oscars party in 2000 as one of her favorites: clasped to the 25-year-old’s tangerine Vera Wang dress were two art-deco diamond clips. “Vera fell in love with the clips and then created the dress around them, ” says Selva. The whole image was beautiful; it was Hollywood glamour in the most sophisticated and refined way. Nowadays, as celebrity outfits are dissected on social media in real time, red-carpet appearances have even more effect on what used to be a very private, elitist market. “The internet has been great in spreading the message about vintage jewelry, ” says Selva. There’s so much to discover – people realise it’s not what they thought it was. It’s not your grandmother’s jewelry, and nothing is so rarefied that it can’t be worn. Even our tiaras can be worn as headbands. For Selva, increased visibility helps to dispel the myth that antique jewelry is outdated. “We have an unbelievable 19th-century diamond snake necklace that looks like the coolest piece anyone could wear, yet it’s almost 120 years old, ” she says. It’s waiting for its red carpet moment. Vintage jewelry’s reputation in the fashion world has been elevated further by Fred Leighton’s collaboration with Net-a-Porter, which began in 2014. Diamonds, pearls and turquoise are bestsellers, along with chunky gold chain bracelets that customers wear stacked with modern designs. The site also works with Fred Leighton to source vintage pieces on demand. Antique jewelry has also found a place in uber-fashionable department store Dover Street Market, which carries a selection of vintage rings and Victorian and Georgian tiaras by British jeweler Bentley & Skinner alongside its roster of modern brands. This departure from the notion of dusty vintage emporiums reflects an increasing desire to own something one-of-a-kind. Instead of being tied to this year’s range, we have 400 years’ worth of ranges, so you’ll always find something that fits. He says 20th-century pieces are far and away the most popular. Everyone wants art deco because it’s stylish and nicely made, and being set in platinum it looks closer to modern jewelry than earlier pieces, which are set in silver. There’s also interest in bold pieces from the 1950s and’60s. Unlike its American counterpart, SJ Phillips doesn’t shout about red-carpet appearances. “That type of advertising works in the States but not here, ” Michelson says. Even if a piece has been worn by someone famous, we don’t tell people. While signed vintage pieces carry a price premium, there are smart buys to be found. “There are some under-appreciated American makers such as Raymond Yard, ” says Michelson. But there are also unsigned pieces that are a match to the big names but half the price. The main thing is that it speaks to the wearer. We never claim that anything is going to be a good investment. It might be, but we’re not an investment broker. ” Rebecca Selva agrees: “If jewelry is fine and fabricated beautifully, it will hold its value, but I would certainly never sell it as an investment. It’s more about the joy you get from it. REVIEW : Dust off your old jewelry boxes and open-up the family vault because you might just be sitting on a fortune. That’s the message from London auctioneer Bonhams this week, as they announced new figures showing the soaring value of vintage jewels. Bonhams say the value of antique and period jewelry has increased by over 80% in the last decade – outdoing average house prices in England, which increased by 47% over the same period. And it’s prompted the auctioneer to launch a campaign urging the public to seek valuations for any forgotten gems they might have stashed away. These types of instances are our key indicators of a gain in momentum. It’s the quality of craftsmanship that is resonating with buyers, the types of stones that were used back then, compared to a modern piece, are special. Vogue’s jewelry editor Carol Woolton isn’t surprised by the jewelry market’s strength in the current economic climate. There are limited resources in the world, mines will run out and there is a finite number of precious stones – that’s what gives it a rarity value. If the catwalks are revisiting silhouettes from a particular decade, the interest will echo through the jewelry world. “Signed items from the Art Deco period and antiques over 100 years old will always be in demand, ” says Ghika. But we’re now seeing post-war period, 1950s jewelry, as well as pieces from the 1960s and 1970s really performing well too. The thing that often prevents people from having their jewelry valued is the assumption that family heirlooms have been set aside because they’re no longer fashionable won’t be worth anything. “People often look at their items without understanding their importance in the context of jewelry history, ” says Ghika. We recently discovered a wonderful and rare Chanel Twist necklace, which a client had brought to a valuation day, but had thought it was just a piece of costume jewelry. But Chanel did make real jewelry as well as pieces in non-precious materials. So how can you tell if something is valuable when digging through an old jewelry stash? Start with the logos and hallmarks, suggests Ghika, noting that the big names (Cartier, Tiffany, Bulgari, Boucheron and Van Cleef and Arpels) will always be winners, but that key names from modern eras (like Andrew Grima of the 1960s, or John Donald of the 1970s) will have equally held their value. Next you should assess the piece’s construction; do the stones have rough edges, are they generously packed in, or was its maker trying to scrimp by using more metal, less diamonds? Even the battered and broken is not entirely beyond hope. “It’s not necessarily the end of the world if something has had some damage, ” says Ghika. Professional repairs, if done well, can be discreet. We have had items come into us in two pieces before and, after it is mended, it hasn’t greatly impacted on the value. The best way to truly know what something might be worth is, of course, to get it valued by a professional. Because it is unlikely that you will be able to tell that the sapphires in granny’s heirloom ring were super-desirable specimens from the Kashmir region or the product of a rare mining community that was only operational for a ten years at the end of the 19th Century. “The Bonhams website offers the option to submit photos if you want to get an initial impression from our experts, then we hold regular valuation days all over the UK, ” advises Ghika. What you can do for yourself, though, is take care of the stocks you’ve got – whether you’re ready to sell them or not. “If you ever think you might sell jewelry on, then you must keep the boxes, ” urges Woolton. The boxes and the paperwork for stones will really add to their value and save a lot of confusion as to what something is when you sell. The worst thing you can do is to let your old jewelry rattle around in a disorganised box. “Don’t over-clean old pieces, ” Ghika also warns. Part of the history is the pattern that it has and if it’s stripped off then it lacks some of its soul. Other expert tips include not keeping hard and soft stones together to prevent erosion, wiping pearls with a cloth after every wear to remove any oils or perfume, and even splitting pairs of earrings into individual soft pouches so that they don’t rub together. If you’re keen to run with’gems over property’ as your new investment mantra, the experts say you may have to wait a while for the dividends if you choose more recent pieces. Woolton, meanwhile, tips Dior’s fine jeweler Victoire de Castellane as one who will create the masterpieces of our time. One thing all experts agree on however, is that primarily jewelry should be worn and enjoyed, with any increase in value seen as an added bonus. “It’s all very well owning these wonderful things, ” says Woolton. But if investors lock them away and don’t wear them then you have to ask; where’s the fun in that? REVIEW : The rise of online vintage jewelry auctions. The global reach of the internet has raised the profiles of local salerooms and consumer confidence with it. Today, with online sales increasing, auctions are just as busy but with fewer people actually in the room. Some of the thrill has gone but the benefit of online auctions is that they’ve boosted the profile of provincial salerooms, making them a force to be reckoned with. Now, the global reach of the internet has raised the profiles of local salerooms and consumer confidence with it. Fellows auctioneers, which offers more than 40 specialist jewelry sales a year, is witnessing a substantial annual increase in its online sales, which represents around 45 per cent of its turnover now. Fellows is holding jewelry auctions throughout November and December. “Look for trade-association endorsement, such as the Society of Fine Art Auctioneers and Valuers (SOFAA), and the Association of Accredited Auctioneers (AAA), ” he says. The site hosts jewelry auctions throughout the year, so if you are looking for a particular item, simply type keywords into the search engine and it will list suitable lots. These are the sales where you will see jewels that will take your breath away, including the Blue Moon diamond going on sale at Sotheby’s Geneva on 11 November. Note: Sotheby’s, Christie’s and Bonhams are not part of a sourcing portal platform so you will need to go to the individual websites to watch live auctions. This is also reinforced by the increase in volume of registrations it is seeing at Bonhams monthly Knightsbridge jewelry sales. Sotheby’s has also witnessed an increase in the number of online buyers participating in their worldwide jewelry sales over the past five years. Make sure you take a good hard look at all the images – including at the reverse image – as well as at the hallmarks. If the auctioneer has stipulated what the item is, then that is their guarantee. Also make sure you’ve checked dimensions so that there are no surprises when your item arrives and is much smaller or bigger than you’d hoped. We package as well as anyone in the business, with lots of protective padding and containers. We do offer U. Please ask for a rate quotation. ABOUT US : Prior to our retirement we used to travel to Eastern Europe and Central Asia several times a year seeking antique gemstones and jewelry from the globe’s most prolific gemstone producing and cutting centers. Most of the items we offer came from acquisitions we made in Eastern Europe, India, and from the Levant (Eastern Mediterranean/Near East) during these years from various institutions and dealers. Though we have a collection of ancient coins numbering in the tens of thousands, our primary interests are ancient/antique jewelry and gemstones, a reflection of our academic backgrounds. Though perhaps difficult to find in the USA, in Eastern Europe and Central Asia antique gemstones are commonly dismounted from old, broken settings – the gold reused – the gemstones recut and reset. Before these gorgeous antique gemstones are recut, we try to acquire the best of them in their original, antique, hand-finished state – most of them originally crafted a century or more ago. We believe that the work created by these long-gone master artisans is worth protecting and preserving rather than destroying this heritage of antique gemstones by recutting the original work out of existence. That by preserving their work, in a sense, we are preserving their lives and the legacy they left for modern times. Far better to appreciate their craft than to destroy it with modern cutting. Not everyone agrees – fully 95% or more of the antique gemstones which come into these marketplaces are recut, and the heritage of the past lost.
Vintage Antique Jewelry Victorian Art Deco Nouveau Lalique Cartier Dior Enamel